LibriVox: The History Of Rasselas, Prince Of Abissinia by Samuel Johnson

September 27, 2009 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Online Audio 

SFFaudio Online Audio

LibriVoxThere are a lot of new audiobooks showing up on LibriVox every day of the week. This means I get to pick and choose amongst a vast roster of titles that I could possibly tell you about. One that I was not planning to post about was a 1759 Fantasy novel by Samuel Johnson. I had nothing against Johnson. I just hadn’t read any of his books. Sure I knew he had written a dictionary, but it wasn’t one of the ones that I had read. The problem really was I just didn’t know enough about Johnson to be interested in his novel. Frankly, the first thing that came to mind when I thought of Dr. Samuel Johnson was how great a character he was in the Ink and Incapability episode of Blackadder. That one never gets old.

But, then today I was listening to my favourite Australian podcast, ABC Radio National’s The Philosopher’s Zone, and they mentioned this book. I suspect this wasn’t fated, it being the 300th anniversary of Johnson’s birth people around the world are thinking about old Johnson – but even if it was fate – either if I changed my mind or my mind was changed – after listening to that show I’m telling you about this novel now. The show |MP3| was actually on Johnson’s stoic christian philosophy – or rather his reaction to the ancient stoics. Host Alan Saunders, and guest, John Wiltshire, talked about a poem and then this book and it’s position in Johnson’s philosophy. It was fascinating! Now to listen…

LibriVox - The History Of Rasselas, Prince Of Abissinia by Samuel JohnsonThe History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia
By Samuel Johnson; Read by Martin Geeson
17 Zipped MP3 Files or Podcast – Approx. 5 Hours 31 Minutes [UNABRIDGED]
Publisher: LibriVox.org
Published: September 25, 2009
In this enchanting fable (subtitled The Choice of Life), Rasselas and his retinue burrow their way out of the totalitarian paradise of the Happy Valley in search of that triad of eighteenth-century aspiration – life, liberty and happiness. According to that quirky authority, James Boswell, Johnson penned his only work of prose fiction in a handful of days to cover the cost of his mother’s funeral. The stylistic elegance of the book and its wide-ranging philosophical concerns give no hint of haste or superficiality. Among other still burning issues Johnson’s characters pursue questions of education, colonialism, the nature of the soul and even climate alteration. Johnson’s profoundest concern, however, is with the alternating attractions of solitude and social participation, seen not only as the ultimate life-choice but as the arena in which are played out the deepest fears of the individual: “Of the uncertainties of our present state, the most dreadful and alarming is the uncertain continuance of Reason.”

Podcast feed:

http://librivox.org/bookfeeds/rasselas-prince-of-abyssinia-by-samuel-johnson.xml

iTunes 1-Click |SUBSCRIBE|

In addition to the reader, Martin Geeson, this audiobook was produced by:

Dedicated Proof-Listener: Stav Nisser
Meta-Coordinator/Cataloging: Leni

[Thanks to all three LibriVoxateers]

Posted by Jesse Willis

Blake’s 7 The Early Years: The Dust Run / The Trial

September 26, 2009 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Audio Drama, News 

SFFaudio News

Blake's 7 - The Early Years - The Dust Run / The TrialBlake’s 7 audio drama writer Ben Aaronovitch is showing off the the latest addition to the Blake’s 7: The Early Years series on his blog. Sez Aaronovitch:

Amazon [UK] are already taking pre-orders for The Dust Run/The Trial, the latest addition to the Blake’s 7: The Early Years audios. This one, featuring Carrie Dobro as Jenna and is written by the frighteningly fecund and swift Simon Guerrier.

As readers of our production blog can discover script editing is not the non-stop round of glamour and excitement that you might imagine it to be but it’s always a thrill to see the covers out there in the world.”

And it looks like Amazon.com has it too HERE.

Hmmm, that makes me think about B7 yet again. I’ve got the current release, Blood & Earth / Flag & Flame, sitting in front of me here. I’ve listened to it twice already. Yep, I’m going to give it one more listen before I review it.

Posted by Jesse Willis

Brain Plucker: OSC on NPR

September 26, 2009 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Online Audio 

SFFaudio Online Audio

NPR - Talk Of The Nation Rick Jackson, an SFFaudio alumnus (and owner of Wonder Audio), has been minding a new blog called Brain Plucker. Here is his latest post in full:

Heard an interesting interview with Orson Scott Card today on NPR’s Talk of the Nation. He talks about the Ender Series. I have to admit I was all onboard with the initial series but lost interest after the parallel Ender’s Shadow series. I liked the original series because each book was unique. Ender’s Shadow wasn’t a bad book by any means. OSC also talks about the comic book adaptation which sounds very interesting. I’m going to take a look at it. But then again after reading the books, my time is probable better spent on something unique to me. He also talks about the Hollywood adaptation of Ender’s Game.

Orson Scott Card interview |MP3|
Talk of the Nation |site summary|

[via the well named Brain Plucker blog]

Posted by Jesse Willis

Radio Drama Revival: The Most Dangerous Game AUDIO DRAMA

September 26, 2009 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Audio Drama, Aural Noir, Online Audio 

Aural Noir: Online Audio

Radio Drama RevivalCOOL! Fred Greenhalgh, of Radio Drama Revival, was inspired by my post called “The Most Dangerous Meme” to re-adapt Richard Connell’s short story, The Most Dangerous Game, as a new audio drama! Sez Fred:

“Closing the month of September is a production I’m thrilled to share with you. It’s the first work out of a three-part collaboration of FinalRune Productions and the Mad Horse Theater Company. The project took classic old time radio plays and brought them to life with modern day field recording, and what fun it was!

The play today is The Most Dangerous Game, by Richard Connell, which was broadcast originally on Escape! and Suspense.”

Recording The Most Dangerous Game

As you can see by the pic above, a “modern day field recording” sound is really what this is. I fell deeply in love with this style of audio drama after listening to Roger Gregg’s Infidel. Have a listen!

Radio Drama Revival - The Most Dangerous Game based on the short story by Richard ConnellThe Most Dangerous Game
Based on the story by Richard Connell; Adapted by Fred Greenhalgh; Performed by a full cast
1 |MP3| – Approx. 32 Minutes [AUDIO DRAMA]
Podcaster: Radio Drama Revival
Podcast: September 25th, 2009
Wealthy big-game hunter Sanger Rainsford falls off his boat in the middle of the Caribbean and finds himself on a curious island. He finds the mansion of General Zaroff, a Cossack who has a taste for the hunt, and will go to any extreme to keep himself interested…

Podcast feed:

http://feeds.feedburner.com/RadioDramaRevival

Posted by Jesse Willis

LibriVox: The Brighton Boys In The Radio Service by

September 26, 2009 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Online Audio 

SFFaudio Online Audio

LibriVoxWhat ho chaps! Now that it’s 1918 and all let’s all go fight in The Great War! It’ll be trenches of fun. Hey look our teacher thinks it’s a smashing idea! Even better, our parents seem to have no objections at all! Now we’re being trained by these jolly good officers! I tell you Uncle Sam is doing us the favor here. My don’t our uniforms look smart.

Yep. You see where this is going don’t you?

Early on in this whip-fast boy’s adventure the bad boy of Brighton, an evil sort named Herbert Wallace, tries to discourage Slim Goodwin, one of our heroes, from enlisting in the U.S. Army’s signal corp. He is of course soundly trounced by the school’s headmaster:

“Well, Wallace,” said the principal of Brighton, “I hear you’ve been studying up on military subjects. Intending to get into the fight?”

Herbert Wallace hung his head and muttered an unintelligible reply.

“Now look here, Wallace,” spoke the headmaster sternly, “where did you get the military manual from which you gave Goodwin the information that he could not pass the examination for the army?”

“I—I got it from the library, sir.”

“Got it without permission, too, didn’t you?” pursued the headmaster.

“Yes, sir,” said Wallace, in confusion.

“And didn’t know that it was out of date, and that the requirements were completely changed after the United States entered this war, eh?”

“No, sir,” answered Wallace, on the verge of a breakdown.

“I’ll decide upon your punishment later,” announced the headmaster. “See me here at four o’clock. Meanwhile, Wallace, be careful where you get information, and be careful how you dispense it.”

Yep. Almost 100 years after the event itself I’m still freaked out by the prospect of shipping off to fight in meat-grinder that was World War I. I find it hard to make a case for censorship. But if I was forced to write an essay arguing in favour of it I would present this book as my primary evidence. And since when should you get permission to go to the school library?

Still, narrator Tom Clifton seems to be having a lot of fun reading this adventure. He’s also added in some morse code transmissions with the actual sounds rather than just reading the dot dashes as they appear in the text.

LibriVox - The Brighton Boys In The Radio Service by Samuel Frances AaronThe Brighton Boys In The Radio Service
By Samuel Frances Aaron; Read by Tom Clifton
20 Zipped MP3 Files or Podcast – Approx. 3 Hours 41 Minutes [UNABRIDGED]
Publisher: LibriVox.org
Published: September 21, 2009
The Brighton Boys in the Radio Service is a boys adventure story set in WWI – Three College Chums join the military and face the perils of spies, submarines and enemy soldiers in the trenches of embattled Europe. An engaging story set in a period where good guys wore white hats, bad guys wore black hats and every chapter ends with a cliffhanger so you have to come back for more!

Podcast feed:
http://librivox.org/bookfeeds/the-brighton-boys-in-the-radio-service-by-james-driscoll.xml

iTunes 1-Click |SUBSCRIBE|

Posted by Jesse Willis

Chapter Two of The Gathering Storm Available at Tor

September 24, 2009 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Online Audio 

SFFaudio Online Audio

The Gathering Storm by Robert Jordan and Brandon SandersonTor appears to be going all-out in its promotion of the 12th installment of Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series, The Gathering Storm, co-written by Brandon Sanderson. In partnership with Macmillan Audio, Tor.com has made the novel’s second chapter, “The Nature of Pain” narrated by Kate Reading, available for online listening.

The Gathering Storm, Chapter Two, “The Nature of Pain”

Registration on Tor.com is required, but it’s fast and free to sign up. The novel’s Prologue, “What the Storm Means”, is also available at Audible for a low price, and the first chapter, “Tears from Steel”, is readable–sadly no audio–at Tor.com. The Gathering Storm will be released on 27 October.

Posted by Seth Wilson

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