Review of The Voice from the Edge Vol 1: I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream by Harlan Ellison

Science Fiction Audiobooks - The Voice from the Edge Vol 1 by Harlan EllisonThe Voice from the Edge Vol 1: I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream
By Harlan Ellison; Read by Harlan Ellison
5 CD’s – 6 hours [UNABRIDGED]
Publisher: Fantastic Audio
Published: 2002
Themes: / Science Fiction / Fantasy / Short Stories / Artificial Intelligence / Time / Demons /

This is a collection of Harlan Ellison’s best (well… most popular) stories. The most oft-reprinted tales are here, among them: “I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream”, “‘Repent, Harlequin,’ Said the Ticktockman”, “Paladin of the Lost Hour”, and “A Boy and His Dog”. The stories are read by the author, who himself is a first-rate reader, lending an infectious energy to every story in the collection.

I personally know of no other author’s stories with which to compare Harlan Ellison’s. He’s arguably the finest writer of short fiction on the planet, building stories of great impact in such a short space. In “‘Repent, Harlequin'”, he gives us a parable of society’s dependence on the clock, making schedules look ridiculous enough to make one wonder what the heck we’re all doing. And this was written in the 1960’s! In “Paladin of the Lost Hour”, a man is given responsibility over the world’s last hour. The characters in “I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream” are trapped by a malevolent computer. These are great stories, every one. I thoroughly enjoyed this collection.

Stories included in the collection: “I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream”, “Laugh Track”, “Grail”, “‘Repent, Harlequin,’ Said the Ticktockman”, The Very Last Day of a Good Woman”, “Paladin of the Lost Hour”, “The Time of the Eye”, “The Lingering Scent of Woodsmoke”, and “A Boy and His Dog”.

CBC Radio One has posted a series of interesting a…

SFFaudio Online Audio

CBC Radio One has posted a series of interesting and quite funny conversations with William Gibson about his novel Pattern Recognition. Here are the links:

|Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 |

Also from CBC Radio One, a 54 minute exploration of the future of textiles! Strange topic, but its quite good. Produced by the always fascinating IDEAS program. Here is the blurb:

THOUGHTS ON THREADS – broadcast on IDEAS April 29, 2002

Will everyone eventually dress like characters on Star Trek? Will synthetics completely replace natural fibres? What is the future of biotextiles and electrotextiles? Ian Clayton investigates the crossover between the science and the science fiction of clothing. Listen to this program in real time (54:20)

While not quite science fiction CBC Radio One‘s program Quirks & Quarks is always popular among Canadian science fiction fans. Here’s an idea of what its all about “For a quarter of a century Quirks & Quarks has brought its listeners to the cutting edge of scientific inquiry. Every week, the program presents the people behind the latest discoveries in the physical and natural sciences – from the smallest sub-atomic particle to the largest objects in the sky and everything in between. The program also examines the political, social, environmental and ethical implications of new developments in science and technology. Quirks & Quarks is a program for people fascinated by the world above, below and around them. And you don’t need a PhD to enjoy it.”

And like all CBC Radio One programs you can listen online live, and listen to past shows.

Posted by Jesse Willis

We made several minor changes throughout the site,…

We made several minor changes throughout the site, hopefully making it a bit easier to navigate. The most significant additions are a Blackstone Audio review page here and a Recorded Books review page here. We’ll create those for other publishers too as we review more and more. Also, we added a Star Trek page here, which we hope to keep updated with the very latest.

Thanks for visiting!

Posted by Scott D. Danielson

Review of Science Fiction: The Literature of the Technological Imagination by Eric S. Rabkin

Audio Lectures Review

Non-fiction - Science Fiction: The Literature of the Technological Imagination by Eric RabkinScience Fiction: The Literature of the Technological Imagination
By Eric S. Rabkin; Read by Eric S. Rabkin
8 cassettes – 4 hours (8 half-hour lectures) [LECTURES]
Publisher: The Teaching Company
Published: 1999
Themes: / Non-Fiction / Science Fiction / Pulp / Hard SF / Cyberpunk / Utopia / Dystopia /

This one is a little different than our usual fiction reviews. Science Fiction: The Literature of the Technological Imagination is a non-fiction series of lectures about the origins, history, and influence of science fiction. Think of it as Science Fiction 101 and you’ll get the idea. As a course it fulfills the promise of its title, breaking down the origins and the meanings within in science fiction literature. Professor Rabkin is a talented lecturer. Though obviously scripted, his naturalistic lectures are thoroughly engaging. The lectures explore the history of science fiction back to its origins in Plato’s Republic, then steadily marches all the way to William Gibson’s Neuromancer. These lectures offer genuinely interesting insight, I learned something interesting in each and every lecture! Rabkin discusses the first science fiction novel, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, examines the pulp phenomena of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and gives examples of what makes hard SF “hard”. He looks at the social, technological, and literary forces that influenced the genre’s authors, and in doing so tells an entertaining story – the story of science fiction! In short, it’s a fascinating listen. I just wish that Rabkin would offer Science Fiction 201 next semester! Each half hour lecture could have easily been expanded into 2 hours.

The lectures are titled:

Lecture 1: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and the Emergence of Science Fiction
Lecture 2: Jules Verne and the Popular Passion for Science
Lecture 3: H.G. Wells and Science Fiction Parables of Social Criticism
Lecture 4: Pulp Culture, World War II, and the Ascendancy of American Science Fiction
Lecture 5: And the Winner Is…Robert A. Heinlein
Lecture 6: Ray Bradbury, Ursula K. LeGuin, and the Expansion of Science Fiction
Lecture 7: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Modern Science Fiction Film
Lecture 8: New Wave, Cyberpunk, and Our Science Fiction World

BBC Radio is probably most famous in Science Ficti…

BBC Radio is probably most famous in Science Fiction and Fantasy circles for its production of The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy by Douglas Adams. But SF&F audio fans outside the U.K. will be pleased to discover that the BBC is available online through streaming media! You’ll need a RealPlayer Plug-in or a Windows Media Player Plug-in to listen. BBC Radio 7 is your best station, it broadcasts 2 hours of science fiction and fantasy every day in two time slots entitled “The 7th Dimension“. Currently being broadcast are BBC produced programs like Earthsearch, Blake’s 7 and Isaac Asimov’s Foundation Trilogy.

Here’s that link:

Other BBC Radio stations do occasional Science Fiction and Fantasy broadcasts as well. Most notably among these infrequent broadcasts would be BBC 4. Here is a link:

Finally, those who remember Doctor Who from television will be excited to learn that the BBC has started to produce some Doctor Who Audio adventures.

Here are the links:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/cult/doctorwho/realtime/index.shtml

http://www.bbc.co.uk/cult/doctorwho/shada/

Another good source for fans of public radio around the world is here: http://www.publicradiofan.com/.

Posted by Jesse Willis